Gilead, Galapagos JAK inhibitor clears phase II test

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A mid-stage trial of Gilead and Galapagos’ JAK1 inhibitor filgotinib has set up a phase III programme for the drug in ankylosing spondylitis as it chases down two already-marketed dugs from Pfizer and Eli Lilly – and a late-stage rival from AbbVie.

In the TORTUGA trial, filgotinib met its clinical objective of reducing disease activity scores compared to placebo in patients with AS, a severe form of arthritis affecting the spine, with more patients achieving the target 20% improvement with the drug (76%) than in the control group (40%).

The drug is also in development for rheumatoid arthritis (RA), ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease with phase III trials already underway in those indications and results due in the coming weeks.

The drug was generally well-tolerated in TORTUGA but one case of deep vein thrombosis gave investors some cause for concern, putting some pressure on Gilead and Galapagos’ share price yesterday before share staged a partial recovery.

DVT is a recognised side effect with Eli Lilly’s JAK1 inhibitor Olumiant(baricitinib), which finally made it to market for rheumatoid arthritis in Europe last year but was rejected in the US at its first filing attempt over the safety issue. Gilead said that in the phase II AS trial the patient had an inherited condition that raised the risk of blood clots and the DVT was not thought to be drug-related.

First-to-market JAK inhibitor Xeljanz (tofacitinib) from Pfizer has already achieved $1bn-plus sales in RA, and with Olumiant somewhat hamstring by the safety issue on its label analysts are viewing the tussle between filgotinib and AbbVie’s upadacitinib as the next big battleground in the JAK inhibitor market.

AbbVie is a little ahead in the race to market, with phase III data in hand showing that upadacitinib is more effective than AbbVie’s $18bn-a-year injectable TNF blocker Humira (adalimumab) in RA when it comes to clinical responses gauged by doctors and patients. Like filgotinib, upadacitinib is also being tested in a string of other indications, including psoriatic arthritis, Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis and atopic dermatitis.

The rivalry is particularly strong as AbbVie was formerly Gilead’s partner for filgotinib, before ducking out of the collaboration and throwing its weight behind its in-house candidate.

SOURCE: http://www.pmlive.com/pharma_news